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SABI PSYCHOLOGY

A Warm Welcome to Sabi Psychology!

Our group provides therapy rooted in valuing the uniqueness and shared humanity of clinicians and clients alike. Being human can be hard and complex. No one has it all figured out! We are all trying to navigate the challenges and sorrows, alongside the joys and fulfillments of life. While each clinician brings their own set of personal and professional experiences, beliefs, and interests, each of us strives to provide a safe, warm, and supportive therapeutic relationship. We share the following core values and goals:

  • Believing and valuing YOU as the expert on yourself

  • Guiding you to trust yourself and make decisions rooted in your values and goals 

  • Accessing the wisdom of the body; for true change and growth, therapy must address all parts of the self and the whole self, not just the "mind"

  • Knowing that you are not broken. No one is "broken." We are all human and therefore imperfect. We can all experience overwhelming suffering at times in our lives. But this does not detract from our wholeness, or our worthiness of compassion, belonging, and love

  • Inviting open dialogue and feedback about therapy and our therapeutic relationship (research shows these kinds of honest conversations are a major factor in client satisfaction and outcomes)

  • Continually reflecting upon our own experiences, identities, values, and beliefs, and cultural norms as they may interact with yours - and exploring individually, or with you, how this may be affecting therapy and the therapeutic relationship

  • Prioritizing collaborative work - therapist and client work actively work together to help you develop/access the resources to navigate life's difficulties

What does Sabi mean?

Sabi is a Japanese word that ties to a long history, philosophy, and set of practices that is related to valuing, embracing, and finding the joy and beauty in imperfection and impermanence as natural parts of life. Some Sabi practices have historically worked to undermine hierarchical and oppressive elements of Japanese society by undermining and challenging symbols of power and prestige.

Kintsugi is a practice that is part of Wabi. Broken pottery, rather than being devalued and discarded, is mended and repaired with gold. There are many metaphors around humanity's imperfections, acceptance, and transformation, but a few are:

  • being "broken," beautiful, and whole all at once

  • being perfectly imperfect

  • Through repair/healing, becoming stronger in the places where you have hurt

  • The act of breaking and becoming whole again - and becoming even more beautiful for having "fallen apart"

  • A well known quote: “There is a crack in everything, that's how the light gets in.”

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